How Nursing Students Perceive Neurofeedback Training as an Independent Nursing Intervention: Pilot Study Focusing on Attitude

AUTHORS

Wanju Park,College of Nursing, The Research Institute of Nursing Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
Shinjeong Park,College of Nursing, The Research Institute of Nursing Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
Sangjin Ko,
Kyengjin Kim,
Moonji Choi,College of Nursing, The Research Institute of Nursing Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the practical feasibility of neurofeedback training (NFT) as an independent nursing intervention and to find out predictive factors of participatory practice in NFT. Data were collected from 250 nursing students using self-reports. The questionnaire was based on the Knowledge-Attitude-Practice (KAP) survey model using Delphi methodology with 3-round surveys. The standardized contents of scale were categorized into three domains, seven subgroups, and a total of 57 items. The data were analyzed using a t-test, ANOVA, a Scheffé test, Pearson's correlation coefficients, a regression analysis, and a Sobel test. Students' knowledge level was at 57%, a low score when compared to attitude and practice. Major barriers to NFT were associated with negative attitudes such as fear of side effects or complications, or using a computerized approach. The attitude toward NFT had a complete mediating effect on the relationship between knowledge and practice (R2=.43; Z=7.44, p<.001). In order for students to be able to apply NFT in the clinical field after graduation, a positive attitude should be cultivated in regular nursing school curriculum. We suggest that NFT can act as a positive nursing intervention if students’ positive attitudes are increased. Future research on a variety of types of NFT is needed. It is the condensed version of the full text of this article.

 

KEYWORDS

Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, Neurofeedback, Nursing

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CITATION

  • APA:
    Park,W.& Park,S.& Ko,S.& Kim,K.& Choi,M.(2018). How Nursing Students Perceive Neurofeedback Training as an Independent Nursing Intervention: Pilot Study Focusing on Attitude. International Journal of Advanced Nursing Education and Research, 3(1), 87-92. 10.21742/IJANER.2018.3.1.15
  • Harvard:
    Park,W., Park,S., Ko,S., Kim,K., Choi,M.(2018). "How Nursing Students Perceive Neurofeedback Training as an Independent Nursing Intervention: Pilot Study Focusing on Attitude". International Journal of Advanced Nursing Education and Research, 3(1), pp.87-92. doi:10.21742/IJANER.2018.3.1.15
  • IEEE:
    [1] W.Park, S.Park, S.Ko, K.Kim, M.Choi, "How Nursing Students Perceive Neurofeedback Training as an Independent Nursing Intervention: Pilot Study Focusing on Attitude". International Journal of Advanced Nursing Education and Research, vol.3, no.1, pp.87-92, May. 2018
  • MLA:
    Park Wanju, Park Shinjeong, Ko Sangjin, Kim Kyengjin and Choi Moonji. "How Nursing Students Perceive Neurofeedback Training as an Independent Nursing Intervention: Pilot Study Focusing on Attitude". International Journal of Advanced Nursing Education and Research, vol.3, no.1, May. 2018, pp.87-92, doi:10.21742/IJANER.2018.3.1.15

ISSUE INFO

  • Volume 3, No. 1, 2018
  • ISSN(p):2207-3981
  • ISSN(e):2207-3159
  • Published:May. 2018

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