The Subjectivity for Companion Animals of Nursing Students

AUTHORS

Sunyoung Jang,Dept. of Nursing, Hanseo University, 46 Hanseo1 Ro, Haemi-myun, Seosan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, 369-709, Korea

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study is to identify the subjectivity of companion animals that nursing students are aware of, to describe the characteristics by type, and to identify the typology of companion animals. The Q methodology was applied. 25 students in the 3rd and 4th grade who were enrolled in A College of Nursing and conducted the training were asked to classify 46 statements about companion animals. The collected data were analyzed using the QUANL PC program. As a result of this study, the nursing students' perception of companion animals was classified into three types. The types of subjectivity to companion animals are 'Protector Type', 'Social Foundation Type', and 'Type of Emphasis on Benefits'. The study provided basic data on the application of animal-assisted therapy in the clinical practice and nursing education.

 

KEYWORDS

Companion, Animal, Nursing, Student, Subjectivity, Q methodology

REFERENCES

[1] Y.M. Kim, “A study on the experience of child raising companion animals and family strength,” Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Inha University, Inchoen, Korea, (2008)
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CITATION

  • APA:
    Jang,S.(2018). The Subjectivity for Companion Animals of Nursing Students. International Journal of Advanced Nursing Education and Research, 3(1), 1-6. 10.21742/IJANER.2018.3.1.01
  • Harvard:
    Jang,S.(2018). "The Subjectivity for Companion Animals of Nursing Students". International Journal of Advanced Nursing Education and Research, 3(1), pp.1-6. doi:10.21742/IJANER.2018.3.1.01
  • IEEE:
    [1] S.Jang, "The Subjectivity for Companion Animals of Nursing Students". International Journal of Advanced Nursing Education and Research, vol.3, no.1, pp.1-6, May. 2018
  • MLA:
    Jang Sunyoung. "The Subjectivity for Companion Animals of Nursing Students". International Journal of Advanced Nursing Education and Research, vol.3, no.1, May. 2018, pp.1-6, doi:10.21742/IJANER.2018.3.1.01

ISSUE INFO

  • Volume 3, No. 1, 2018
  • ISSN(p):2207-3981
  • ISSN(e):2207-3159
  • Published:May. 2018

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